8th Edition of International Conference on

Chemical Sciences

Theme: Recent Trends and Advancements in the field of Chemical Sciences

Event Date & Time

Event Location

London, UK

16 years of lifescience communication

Performers / Professionals From Around The Globe

Tracks & Key Topics

Chemical Sciences 2018

About Conference

Euro Scicon invites all the participants from all over the world to attend "8th International Conference on Chemical Sciences’’ during June 14-15, 2018 at London, UK which includes prompt keynote presentations, Oral talks (Speaker Forum and Young research Forum), Poster presentations, Workshops and Exhibitions.

Chemical Sciences 2018 is a global overview the Theme: “Recent Trends and Advancements in the field of Chemical Sciences” is aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Chemical Sciences. It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Chemical Sciences.

Call for Contributions

All honorable authors are kindly encouraged to contribute to and help shape the conference through submissions of their research abstracts, papers and e-posters. Also, high quality research contributions describing original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, or theoretical work in all areas of Chemical Sciences are cordially invited for presentation at the conference. The conference solicits contributions of abstracts, papers and e-posters that address themes and topics of the conference, including figures, tables and references of novel research materials.

Target Audience for Chemical Sciences 2018:

Eminent Scientists/ Research Professors in the field of Chemical Sciences, Junior/Senior research fellows, Students, Directors of chemicals research companies, Chemical Engineers, Members of Chemistry associations and exhibitors from chemicals Industry/chemical Industries.

Why to attend our Conference:

Scope and Importance: With the growing awareness and focus on improving and maintaining the environment, the regulatory impact on the chemical market in which Chemical Science is indulged has grown. Coatings, resins, gases, fuels, pesticides, cosmetics have all seen areas of growth on a global and segmented geographical scales. BCC Research reports provide high quality market forecasts and trends based on current analysis of the market and the market drivers. Patent analysis and company profiles of major players and stakeholders within the chemical science market within the reports show emerging products and technologies that are environmentally friendly and in some cases help sustain the environment. The areas covered range from commodity chemical products to smaller specialized Chemical markets. Chemistry is too universal and dynamically-changing a subject to be confined to a fixed definition, it might be better to think of chemistry more as a point of view that places its major focus on the structure and properties of substances particular kinds of matter and especially on the changes that they undergo. The real importance of Chemistry is that it serves as the interface to practically all of the other sciences, as well as to many other areas of human endeavour. For this reason, Chemistry is often said (at least by chemists!) to be the "central science". Chemistry can be "central" in a much more personal way: with a solid background in Chemistry, you will find it far easier to migrate into other fields as your interests develop. Chemistry is so deeply ingrained into so many areas of business, government, and environmental management that some background in the subject can be useful (and able to give you a career edge as a team member having special skills) in fields as varied as product development, marketing, management, computer science, technical writing, and even law. It also provides the platform for researchers, scholars and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns, practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted in the field of Chemical Science. The recent research in chemical science shares knowledge to scholars pursing their studies in this field.

Sessions/Tracks

Chemical compound is an entity consisting of two or more atoms, at least two from different chemical elements, which associate via chemical bonds. There are four types of compounds, depending on how the constituent atoms are held together: molecules held together by covalent bonds, ionic compounds held together by ionic bonds, intermetallic compounds held together by metallic bonds, and certain complexes held together by coordinate covalent bonds. Many chemical compounds have a unique numerical identifier assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS): its CAS number. A chemical formula is a way of expressing information about the proportions of atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound, using the standard abbreviations for the chemical elements, and subscripts to indicate the number of atoms involved. For example, water is composed of two hydrogen atoms bonded to one oxygen atom: the chemical formula is H2O. 
 
 
Organic chemistry is a chemistry subdiscipline involving the scientific study of the structure, properties, and reactions of organic compounds and organic materials, i.e., matter in its various forms that contain carbon atoms. The study of organic reactions includes probing their scope through use in preparation of target compounds (e.g., natural products, drugs, polymers, etc.) by chemical synthesis, as well as the focused study of the reactivities of individual organic molecules, both in the laboratory and via theoretical (in silico) study. Inorganic chemistry deals with the synthesis and behavior of inorganic and organometallic compounds. This field covers all chemical compounds except the myriad organic compounds (carbon based compounds, usually containing C-H bonds), which are the subjects of organic chemistry. It has applications in every aspect of the chemical industry, including catalysis, materialsscience, pigments, surfactants, coatings, medications, fuels, and agriculture.
 
Physical chemistry is the study of macroscopic, atomic, subatomic and particulate phenomena in chemical systems in terms of the principles, practices and concepts of physics such as motion, energy, force, time, thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, statistical mechanics, analytical dynamics and chemical equilibrium. Physical chemistry, in contrast to chemical physics, is predominantly (but not always) a macroscopic or supra-molecular science, as the majority of the principles on which it was founded relate to the bulk rather than the molecular/atomic structure alone (for example, chemical equilibrium and colloids). Theoretical chemistry is a branch of chemistry, which develops theoretical generalizations that are part of the theoretical arsenal of modern chemistry, for example, the concept of chemical bonding, chemical reaction, valence, the surface of potential energy, molecular orbitals, orbital interactions, molecule activation etс. in recent years, it has consisted primarily of quantum chemistry. 
 
 
Heterocyclic compound or ring structure is a cyclic compound that has atoms of at least two different elements as members of its ring (s). Heterocyclic chemistry is the branch of organic chemistry dealing with the synthesis, properties and applications of these heterocycles. Examples of heterocyclic compounds include all of the nucleic acids, the majority of drugs, most biomass (cellulose and related materials), and many natural and synthetic dyes. Heterocyclic compounds can be usefully classified based on their electronic structure. The saturated heterocycles behave like the acyclic derivatives. Thus, piperidine and tetrahydrofuran are conventional amines and ethers, with modified steric profiles. Therefore, the study of heterocyclic chemistry focuses especially on unsaturated derivatives, and the preponderance of work and applications involves unstrained 5- and 6-membered rings. Included are pyridine, thiophene, pyrrole, and furan.
 
 
Electrochemistry is the branch of physical chemistry that studies the relationship between electricity, as a measurable and quantitative phenomenon, and identifiable chemical change, with either electricity considered an outcome of a particular chemical change or vice versa. These reactions involve electric charges moving between electrodes and an electrolyte (or ionic species in a solution). Thus electrochemistry deals with the interaction between electrical energy and chemical change. Electrochemistry has also important applications in the food industry, like the assessment of food/package interactions, the analysis of milk composition, the characterization and the determination of the freezing end-point of ice-cream mixes, the determination of free acidity in olive oil. he spontaneous redox reactions of a conventional battery produce electricity through the different chemical potentials of the cathode and anode in the electrolyte. Electrolysis requires an external source of electrical energy to induce a chemical reaction, and this process takes place in a compartment called an electrolytic cell. There are various extremely important electrochemical processes in both nature and industry, like the coating of objects with metals or metal oxides through electrodeposition and the detection of alcohol in drunken drivers through the redox reaction of ethanol. Corrosion is an electrochemical process, which reveals itself in rust or tarnish on metals like iron or copper and their respective alloys, steel and brass. Attempts to save a metal from becoming anodic are of two general types. Anodic regions dissolve and destroy the structural integrity of the metal.While it is almost impossible to prevent anode/cathode formation, if a non-conducting material covers the metal, contact with the electrolyte is not possible and corrosion will not occur. Corrosion can be prevented by coating, sacrificial anodes.
 
Track 6: Geochemistry
 
Geochemistry is the science that uses the tools and principles of chemistry to explain the mechanisms behind major geological systems such as the Earth's crust and its oceans. The realm of geochemistry extends beyond the Earth, encompassing the entire Solar System Some subsets of geochemistry are: Isotope geochemistry involves the determination of the relative and absolute concentrations of the elements and their isotopes in the earth and on earth's surface. Biogeochemistry is the field of study focusing on the effect of life on the chemistry of the earth. Organic geochemistry involves the study of the role of processes and compounds that are derived from living or once-living organisms.
 
Nuclear chemistry is the subfield of chemistry dealing with radioactivity, nuclear processes, such as nuclear transmutation and nuclear properties. It is the chemistry of radioactive elements such as the actinides, radium and radon together with the chemistry associated with equipment (such as nuclear reactors) which are designed to perform nuclear processes. This includes the corrosion of surfaces and the behavior under conditions of both normal and abnormal operation (such as during an accident). An important area is the behavior of objects and materials after being placed into a nuclear waste storage or disposal site.  As a result, nuclear chemistry greatly assists the understanding of medical treatments (such as cancer radiotherapy) and has enabled these treatments to improve. Radiochemistry is the chemistry of radioactive materials, where radioactive isotopes of elements are used to study the properties and chemical reactions of non-radioactive isotopes (often within radiochemistry the absence of radioactivity leads to a substance being described as being inactive as the isotopes are stable). Radiochemistry includes the study of the behavior of radioisotopes in the environment; for instance, a forest or grass fire can make radioisotopes become mobile again. One biological application is the study of DNA using radioactive phosphorus-32. In these experiments stable phosphorus is replaced by the chemical identical radioactive P-32, and the resulting radioactivity is used in analysis of the molecules and their behavior.
 
Track 8: Biochemistry 
 
Biochemistry sometimes called biological chemistry is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. By controlling information flow through biochemical signaling and the flow of chemical energy through metabolism, biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology. The mechanisms by which cells harness energy from their environment via chemical reactions are known as metabolism. The findings of biochemistry are applied primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate the causes and cures of diseases.In nutrition, they study how to maintain health and study the effects of nutritional deficiencies. In agriculture, biochemists investigate soil and fertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage and pest control.
 
 
Medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry are disciplines at the intersection of chemistry, especially synthetic organic chemistry, and pharmacology and various other biological specialties, where they are involved with design, chemical synthesis and development for market of pharmaceutical agents, or bio-active molecules (drugs). In particular, medicinal chemistry in its most common practice-focusing on small organic molecules-encompasses synthetic organic chemistry and aspects of natural products and computational chemistry in close combination with chemical biology, enzymology and structural biology, together aiming at the discovery and development of new therapeutic agents. At the biological interface, medicinal chemistry combines to form a set of highly interdisciplinary sciences, setting its organic, physical, and computational emphases alongside biological areas such as biochemistry, molecular biology, pharmacognosy and pharmacology, toxicology and veterinary and human medicine, these with project management, statistics and pharmaceutical business practices.
 
 
Polymer chemistry is a chemistry subdiscipline that deals with the structures, chemical synthesis and properties of polymers, primarily synthetic polymers such as plastics and elastomers. Polymer chemistry is related to the broader field of polymer science, which also encompasses polymer physics and polymer engineering. The chemist Hermann Staudinger first proposed that polymers consisted of long chains of atoms held together by covalent bonds, which he called macromolecules. His work expanded the chemical understanding of polymers and was followed by an expansion of the field of polymer chemistry during which such polymeric materials as neoprene, nylon and polyester were invented. Polymers are high molecular mass compounds formed by polymerization of monomers. The simple reactive molecule from which the repeating structural units of a polymer are derived is called a monomer. A polymer is chemically described by its degree of polymerisation, molar mass distribution, tacticity, copolymer distribution, the degree of branching, by its end-groups, crosslinks, crystallinity and thermal properties such as its glass transition temperature and melting temperature. Polymers in solution have special characteristics with respect to solubility, viscosity and gelation.
 
 
Forensic chemistry is the application of chemistry and its subfield, forensic toxicology in a legal setting. A forensic chemist can assist in the identification of unknown materials found at a crime scene. Specialists in this field have a wide array of methods and instruments to help identify unknown substances. These include high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thin layer chromatography. One of the most important advancements in forensic chemistry came in 1955 with the invention of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) by Fred McLafferty and Roland Gohlke.
 
 
Environmental chemistry is the scientific study of the chemical and biochemical phenomena that occur in natural places. It should not be confused with green chemistry, which seeks to reduce potential pollution at its source. It can be defined as the study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the air, soil, and water environments; and the effect of human activity and biological activity on these. Environmental chemistry is an interdisciplinary science that includes atmospheric, aquatic and soil chemistry, as well as heavily relying on analytical chemistry and being related to environmental and other areas of science. Environmental chemists draw on a range of concepts from chemistry and various environmental sciences to assist in their study of what is happening to a chemical species in the environment. Important general concepts from chemistry include understanding chemical reactions and equations, solutions, units, sampling, and analytical techniques.
 
 
Bioorganic chemistry is a rapidly growing scientific discipline that combines organic chemistry and biochemistry. While biochemistry aims at understanding biological processesusing chemistry, bioorganic chemistry attempts to expand organic-chemical researches (that is, structures, synthesis, and kinetics) toward biology. When investigating metalloenzymes and cofactors, bioorganic chemistry overlaps bioinorganic chemistry. Biophysical organic chemistry is a term used when attempting to describe intimate details of molecular recognition by bioorganic chemistry. Bioorganic chemistry is that branch of life science that deals with the study of biological processes using chemical methods.
 
 
Analytical chemistry studies and uses instruments and methods used to separate, identify, and quantify matter. In practice separation, identification or quantification may constitute the entire analysis or be combined with another method. Separation isolates analytes. Qualitative analysis identifies analytes, while quantitative analysis determines the numerical amount or concentration. Analytical chemistry consists of classical, wet chemical methods and modern, instrumental methods. Classical qualitative methods use separations such as precipitation, extraction, and distillation. Identification may be based on differences in color, odor, melting point, boiling point, radioactivity or reactivity. Classical quantitative analysis uses mass or volume changes to quantify amount. Instrumental methods may be used to separate samples using chromatography, electrophoresis or field flow fractionation. Then qualitative and quantitative analysis can be performed, often with the same instrument and may use light interaction, heat interaction, electric fields or magnetic fields . Often the same instrument can separate, identify and quantify an analyte. Analytical chemistry is also focused on improvements in experimental design, chemometrics, and the creation of new measurement tools. Analytical chemistry has broad applications to forensics, medicine, science and engineering.
 
 
Chemical engineering is a branch of engineering that applies physical sciences (physics and chemistry), life sciences (micro biology and biochemistry), together with applied mathematics and economics to produce, transform, transport, and properly use chemicals, materials and energy. A chemical engineer designs large-scale processes that convert chemicals, raw materials, living cells, microorganisms and energy into useful forms and products. Advancements in computer science found applications designing and managing plants, simplifying calculations and drawings that previously had to be done manually. The completion of the Human Genome Project is also seen as a major development, not only advancing chemical engineering but genetic engineering and genomics as well. Chemical engineering principles were used to produce DNA sequences in large quantities. Using engineering's own analytical and synthetic methodologies and also its traditional sensitivity to the cost and practicality of the solution (s) arrived. Industrial bio-engineering extends from the creation of artificial organs by technical means or finds ways of growing organs and tissues through the methods of regenerative medicine to compensate reduced or lost physiological functions (Biomedical Engineering) and to develop genetically modified organisms, i.e., agricultural plants and animals as well as the molecular designs of compounds with desired properties (protein engineering, engineering enzymology). In the non-medical aspects of bio-engineering, it is closely related to biotechnology, nanotechnology.
 
 
Product Innovation is the creation and subsequent introduction of a good or service that is either new, or an improved version of previous goods or services. This is broader than the normally accepted definition of innovation that includes the invention of new products which, in this context, are still considered innovative. Development of new products, changes in design of established products or use of new materials or components in the manufacture of established products. Numerous examples of product innovation include introducing new products, enhanced quality and improving its overall performance. Product innovation, alongside cost-cutting innovation and process innovation are three different classifications of innovation which aim to develop a company's production methods.Thus product innovation can be divided into two categories of innovation: radical innovation which aims at developing a new product, and incremental innovation which aims at improving existing products.
 
 
Green chemistry, also called sustainable chemistry, is an area of chemistry and chemical engineering focused on the designing of products and processes that minimize the use and generation of hazardous substances. Whereas environmental chemistry focuses on the effects of polluting chemicals on nature, green chemistry focuses on technological approaches to preventing pollution and reducing consumption of nonrenewable resources. Green chemistry overlaps with all subdisciplines of chemistry but with a particular focus on chemical synthesis, process chemistry, and chemical engineering, in industrial applications. To a lesser extent, the principles of green chemistry also affect laboratory practices. The overarching goals of green chemistry-namely, more resource-efficient and inherently safer design of molecules, materials, products.
 
 
The complexity of medical problems is a well-recognized phenomenon. In the presence of economic and cultural restrictions, medical decision-making can be particularly challenging. This paper outlines a system of analysis and decision-making for solving such problems, and briefly describes a case study in which the method was used to analyze the case of antibiotic overprescribing in a large health maintenance organization. The purpose of the study was to determine if a technique for problem-solving in the field of engineering could be applied to the complex problems facing primary care. The method is designated Systematic Inventive Thinking and consists of a three-step procedure: problem reformulation, general search-strategy selection and an application of idea-provoking techniques. The problem examined is the over-prescribing of antibiotics by general practitioners working in Maccabi Healthcare Services, an HMO serving one and a half million patients in Israel. The group of healthcare professionals involved in the discussions generated 117 ideas for improving antibiotic use. Six of these ideas were then implemented in a national campaign in the winter of 2000/1 and 2001/2. During this period, a significant reduction in per-visit antibiotic purchasing was observed for influenza visits (from 79.2 per 1,000 to 58.1 per 1,000, P < 0.0001), but not for other categories of visits. The SIT methodology is a useful technique for problem-solving and idea generation within the medical framework.
 
 
System integration is defined in engineering as the process of bringing together the component sub-systems into one system (an aggregation of subsystems cooperating so that the system is able to deliver the overarching functionality) and ensuring that the subsystems function together as a system. The list of life sciences comprise the branches of science that involve the scientific study of living organisms such as micro organisms, plants, animals, and human beings as well as related considerations like bioethics. While biology remains the centerpiece of the life sciences, technological advances in molecular biology and biotechnology have led to a burgeoning of specializations and interdisciplinary fields. Some life sciences focus on a specific type of life. For example, zoology is the study of animals, while botany is the study of plants. Other life sciences focus on aspects common to all or many life forms, such as anatomy and genetics. Yet other fields are interested in technological advances involving living things, such as bio engineering. Another major, though more specific, branch of life sciences involves understanding the mind neuroscience.

Market Analysis

Information provided is the chemical science analyses of global market trends, with data from 2014 estimates for 2015 and 2016 and projections of CAGRs through 2021. Discussion of the markets by end-use application and major types of materials used, covering all the major ingredients. Evaluation of new patents and technological developments.Identification of companies potentially involved in mergers and acquisitions.Determinations of the sales potential for new formulations. Examinations of various regulatory and environmental issues as new ingredients are introduced. Comprehensive profiles of major end-user companies, along with their shares of the markets in their respective segments of operation.The chemicals market consists of speciality chemicals, commodity chemicals, agricultural chemicals, and other chemicals (which includes products such as pharmaceutical chemicals).

Market values are taken at producer selling price (PSP).The global chemicals market is expected to generate total revenues of $4,378.7bn in 2016, representing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.9% between 2012 and 2016.The performance of the market is forecast to follow a similar pattern with an anticipated CAGR of 3.8% for the five-year period 2016 - 2021.

Global Chemicals industry profile provides top-line qualitative and quantitative summary information including: market size (value 2012-16, and forecast to 2021). The profile also contains descriptions of the leading players including key financial metrics and analysis of competitive pressures within the market. Essential resource for top-line data and analysis covering the global chemicals market.  Includes market size and segmentation data, textual and graphical analysis of market growth trends and leading companies.The chemicals market consists of speciality chemicals, commodity chemicals, agricultural chemicals, and other chemicals (which includes products such as pharmaceutical chemicals). Market values are taken at producer selling price (PSP). Any currency conversions used in the creation of this report have been calculated using constant 2015 annual average exchange rates. The global chemicals market is expected to generate total revenues of $4,378.7bn in 2016, representing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.9% between 2012 and 2016. Commodity chemicals dominate the global market. The prevalence of commodity chemical production is common across the globe as they are typically low-cost and low-skill to produce, however increasing technology and chemical expertise fuelled by increasing investment has resulted in the sustained growth of specialty chemicals. The performance of the market is forecast to follow a similar pattern with an anticipated CAGR of 3.8% for the five-year period 2016 - 2021. Scope: Save time carrying out entry-level research by identifying the size, growth, major segments, and leading players in the global chemicals market. Use the Five Forces analysis to determine the competitive intensity and therefore attractiveness of the global chemicals market. Leading company profiles reveal details of key chemicals market players' global operations and financial performance. Add weight to presentations and pitches by understanding the future growth prospects of the global chemicals market with five year forecasts.

Media Partners/Collaborator

A huge thanks to all our amazing partners. We couldn’t have a conference without you!

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